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« Jesus: The First Libertarian? | Main | Oldie but goodie: Least successful Xmas specials »

Monday, December 24, 2007

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toast

I agree w/you 100%, and thank you for putting words and clarity to the issue (not Strummer necessarily, but the blind, us vs. them thing). From my own middle-aged vantage point, what is allowable, maybe even forgivable (aggressive, exclusive idealism in this instance) in youth, is narrow and boxy and unsavory in those who should have grown up to know better. When the flag-bearing itself becomes the call to action, when only the like-minded are allowed (as long as it serves the bearer/like-minded), tedium reigns, needless suffering ensues. I've come to value the cracking open of life over the hunkering down, regardless of the opening or closing; and take enormous pleasure in living like opinions - mine or anyone else's - are arbitrary at best.

Janet

Daniel and I observe all too often that the intellectual capabilities of so many seem to ossify as they get older. Long-held opinions solidify into immutable truth, regardless of data to the contrary, new discoveries or changing circumstances. It seems as though it's just too much trouble to change your mind.

Toast, I love the way you put it: "narrow and boxy and unsavory in those who should have grown up to know better."

It's so much more disappointing in people one used to admire for their insightful, dynamic thinking.

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