XARK 3.0

  • Xark began as a group blog in June 2005 but continues today as founder Dan Conover's primary blog-home. Posts by longtime Xark authors Janet Edens and John Sloop may also appear alongside Dan's here from time to time, depending on whatever.

Xark media


  • ALIENS! SEX! MORE ALIENS! AND DUBYA, TOO! Handcrafted, xarky science fiction, lovingly typeset for your home printer!

  • XARK TV

  • XARKAGANDA

  • XARKTOONS
Blog powered by Typepad
Member since 06/2005

Statcounter has my back

« Twitter: 'It's the Internet' | Main | Civilization »

Tuesday, June 16, 2009

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341c5d3453ef0115711a18dc970b

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference The betrayal of the Fourth Estate:

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

John Robinson

Agree with much here, but I gotta tell you as someone who was involved, Death by Journalism? is not the best example you can use here to make your point.

xarkGirl

Duly noted. It did provoke some serious discussion about the nature of journalism around the xark estate.

Pam

I can't help but think that in the majority of work places (and for a very long time), many individuals have been promoted and mentored not based on their potential or skill - but because of internal politics, biases, etc. After years of this we have been left with institutions with the less creative/talented at the top (I fully understand that this is a generalization and is not always the case) and talented individuals in the lower ranks who are being creatively stifled and not supported. I can't help but think much of the economic downturn and corporate f*ck ups is due to this - and the way business have worked are now paying the price. The best people aren't in charge. Just a developing theory...

Do I sound bitter? :)

Dan

I like to tell people that I'm not bitter, I'm experienced.

What inspires me today is that we're in the midst of a revolution in possibility. It's not just tech and economics that are in flux -- it's our assumptions about "how things are." The people who make things ugly and profit from that ugliness depend on the rest of us believing that their "system of the world" is unavoidable.

We have to begin by believing that better things are possible.

And then we go make them happen.

The comments to this entry are closed.